Methods to Estimate Growth Potenital


- Discussion:
    - growth-remaining method
    - straight-line graph method 
    - arithmetic method is the simplest, but least accurate.
           - proximal femoral physis::
           - 4 mm / yr (1/8 in/yr)
    - distal femoral physis:
           - 10 mm / yr (3/8 in/yr)
           - contributes to 70% of femoral growth or 54% of lower limb growth;
    - proximal tibial physis:
           - 6 mm / yr (1/4 in/yr)
           - contributes to 60% of tibia growth or 46% of limb growth;
     - distal tibial physis:
           - 5 mm / yr (3/16 in/yr) 
     - total adult height = Ht. at age 2 x 2
     - growth ceases: 14 - 15 yrs in girls
                      16 - 17 yrs for boys

     - Menelaus method:
          - calculate current discrepancy
          - calculate the change in discrepancy per year
          - calculate the time remaining for growth (girls: 14 - current, boys: 16- current)
          - calculate the discrepancy at maturity: (current discrepancy + (years remaining * discrepancy per year)) 

      - Muliplier Method:
          - Multiplier method for predicting limb-length discrepancy.
          - Clinical validation of the multiplier method for predicting limb length at maturity, part I.
          - Clinical Validation of the Multiplier Method for Predicting Limb Length Discrepancy and Outcome of Epiphysiodesis, Part II.
          - The multiplier method for prediction of adult height.



A graphic method for timing the correction of leg-length discrepancy.

Deficiencies of current methods for the timing of epiphysiodesis

The accuracy of current methods in determining the timing of epiphysiodesis




- contributions to growth of each plate in each of the long bones:
     proximal humerus:......80%
     distal humerus:............20%
     proximal radius:..........25%
     distal radius:................75%
     proximal ulna:.............20%
     distal ulna:...................80%
     proximal femur:...........30%
     distal femur:.................70%
     proximal tibia:..............57%
     distal tibia:....................43%
     proximal fibula:............60%
     distal fibula:..................40%





Original Text by Clifford R. Wheeless, III, MD.

Last updated by Data Trace Staff on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 9:34 am